Animal Disease Traceability

KDA ADT Forum

The Kansas Department of Agriculture hosted an Animal Disease Traceability (ADT) Forum on Thursday, June 22, 2017, at the K-State Alumni Center in Manhattan. More than 60 stakeholders provided input to officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS) in regard to the current ADT system and the successes and challenges of the current ADT framework.

USDA APHIS is hosting two remaining regional stakeholder meetings along with a national forum:
July 18 in Omaha, Nebraska
July 20 in Fort Worth, Texas
September 26-27: NIAA/USAHA Traceability Forum in Denver, Colorado

For more information on these meetings or documents from past regional meetings, click here.

In addition, USDA APHIS is accepting written comments on the ADT system, which you can submit here.  (The comment link is at the upper right hand corner of the page.)

What is ADT?

Animal disease traceability - knowing where diseased and at-risk animals are, where they've been, and when - is important to ensure a rapid response when animal disease events take place. An efficient and accurate animal disease traceability system helps reduce the number of animals involved in an investigation, reduces the time needed to respond, and decreases the cost to producers and the government.

The federal Traceability for Livestock Moved Interstate rule, effective March 2013, established minimum national official identification and documentation requirements for the traceability of livestock moving interstate. The species covered in the rule include cattle and bison, sheep and goats, swine, horses and other equines, captive cervids (e.g., deer and elk), and poultry. When these animals move interstate, unless otherwise exempt, they must be officially identified and accompanied by an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection (ICVI) or other movement document agreed upon by both the sending and receiving states.

New Official Identification Reference Deck

Download a printable version of the Official Livestock Identification Reference Deck here. This reference is a species-specific guide to Kansas- and USDA-approved official identification.

Producers may apply official identification to their own animals before they are transported interstate, and metal ear tags are available at approved tag distributors across Kansas. Click here for a list of tag distributors in your area in your area.

ADT General Requirements

Under the final rule, unless specifically exempted, livestock moved interstate must be officially identified and accompanied by an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection or other documentation, such as an owner-shipper statement.
 
For more specific details about the regulation, visit the USDA-APHIS Traceability website, or call the Kansas Animal Health office at (785) 564-6601.

Full text of the USDA-APHIS Traceability for Livestock Moved Interstate Final Rule published in the Federal Register can be found here.

More information about the final ADT rule can be found in the Animal Disease Traceability Fact Sheet.

The requirements do not apply to livestock moving:
     •      Entirely within Tribal land that straddles a State line and the Tribe has a separate 
             traceability system from the States in which its lands are located
     •      To a custom slaughter facility in accordance with Federal and State regulations for
             preparation of meat

Other exemptions are applied on a species-specific basis.